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What seeds are we starting this week?

Tomatoes!

Everyone’s favorite fruit 🙂

Timing is of the essence here as we would like to transplant them outside after all fear have frost has passed and temperatures are above 45F. Tomatoes may suffer tissue damage otherwise.

We want to transplant without fruit and flowers as these are critical growing stages and can be very shocking. Starting seeds at the right time (nowish).

Tomato seeds like warm soil temperature and even moisture. Tomatoes are not a large seed and should be sown at 1/8″-1/4″.

We have around 2.5 months prior to our target date- start them in 4″ pots so they have room to grow and reduce the amount of “potting ups”.

Feed your tomatoes every couple of weeks and provide them adequate light and heat. Interplant with aromatic herbs such as basil, parsley and oregano. Depending on your type use cages or trellising…homegrown sweetness is just around the corner (well roughly 5 months).

Yes we do have tomato seeds available: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/product-category/shop-seeds/

Alaska sown-Alaska Grown

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What seeds are we starting this week?

Cabbage!

Cabbage seeds are small and should not be planted deeply. 1/4″ depth is perfect for them. Germination temperature is vast: 45F-85F…try to stay within this range. The more consistent temperature/moisture is present the more consistent and timely germination is possible.

Cabbages are heavy feeders- they are large plants with a long growing season. As we are providing all of their needs indoors, remember to feed them often.

Not all cabbages are alike…some are great for rolls, wraps, wilted veggies bowls and fresh shredding. Others are perfect for sauerkraut and long term storage.

Cabbages are large plants and take their time to grow. The target indoor start date is between 8-10 weeks of killing frosts (28F). One thing about my favorite cabbage is that it is exceptionally cold hardy and has overwintered in the field.

The cold hardiness allows it to be transplanted out earlier than other types. It can withstand really, really cold temperatures and with just a little protection can be set out as soon as the soil can be worked.

What does as soon as the soil can be worked mean? When the snow and ice have melted, your boot isn’t covered in soil mud AND you can no longer wring the water out of the soil. Using a soil thermometer is another tool that can help guide us to know if we are at/above 50F (the ideal soil temperature for cabbages).

Brunswick Drumhead cabbage is my favorite! This cabbage is perfect for kraut, storage, rolls, fresh, wraps and wilted.

We do have seeds available: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/product/brunswick-cabbage-brassica-oleracea/

Alaska sown-Alaska grown

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To soak or not to soak…that is the question (?)

The ecological relationship between seed and soil is like a symphony; there are natural cues that promote germination.

One of the major cues is moisture level! When the conditions are right, the seed will follow its own instinct and begin to swell. Once the seed coat is soft and moist the new seedling erupts into life.

The germination time for seeds varies greatly depending on the species. Some seeds can take years for germination (peonies) and others germinate in less than three days (cabbage family). We can use a mechanical force to speed the germination time (soaking).

Large seeds with hard coats (sunflowers, honeywort, peas, beans, corn and sweet peas) will appreciate a longer soaking- up to 24 hours.

Larger seeds with softer coats such as pumpkins, squash, chard, beets, nasturtium and cucumber are perfect to soak overnight.

Small seeds like lettuce, radish, carrots and tomatoes can become mushy and sticky if soaked too long (15-30 min) is appropriate.

Find a shallow bowl, place your seeds and top with water. Set away from pets, kids and spouses out of direct sunlight and in a warm location. Warm water is best but any water will do (what would nature do).

Once seeds have soaked and swelled…it is time to plant! Follow your seed packet guidelines for planting depth or reference our write up: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/…/seed-starting-simply/

When in doubt…ask the question: What would nature do?

Alaska Sown-Alaska Grown

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What seeds are we starting this week

Chives!

One of my favorite “stacking” plants…chives have so many functions within the garden ecology and they are one of the easiest plants to grow with a little attention.

A hardy herbaceous perennial (zone 3 to 11) that serves as an edible perennial, pollinator attractor, biocontrol, cut flower, edible flower, self seeding plant that can be divided in the fall every 2-3 years. I don’t think it get much better than that.

We intensively plant chives around our Apple trees to outcompete the grass but to also attract pollinators and beneficial insects.

Start in flats or cell packs. Sow 1/4″ deep with germination occurring within 10-14 days. Once chives reach about 5″ in height, give them a nice trim to 2″.

Don’t forget to feed them every 3 weeks while growing indoors.

Yes! We do have seeds available: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/product-category/shop-seeds/

Happy Growing!

Alaska sown-Alaska grown

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Give me shelter from the storm

People have basic needs: food, air, shelter and water. The plants that we grow in our gardens and farms also have the same basic requirements.

The beneficial insects and “pests” have these same needs too. When we observe our growing space at the start of the season, we reflect and ask are all their needs being met and if not… how can I meet those needs?

If an issue arises such as an infestation or disease, it is a time to pause and determine if all needs are being met at the proper amounts. An overabundance of water may have some not so desirable results and too much nitrogen can be a detriment to a plant’s system. Too much food and water may inhibit proper growth.

Now is the perfect time to design which elements can be incorporated into our growing spaces to invite life back onto the landscape. Maybe some shallow dishes filled with stones will provide the local pollinators with a drink of water. Another option would to pile rocks with damp leaves so that ground crawlers can seek refuge. Even adding some mulch on top of the soil to reduce evaporation and retain moisture will aid microbial life and provide an opportunity to thrive.

Systems thinking… we become a part of the system in which we grow.

Alaska sown-Alaska grown