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Farmhouse Kitchen Recipe: Daily Bread

8 ingredients

From the farm
  • 1 Egg yolk
Yeasts and Salts
  • 1 1/2 tbsp 2 packages active dry yeast or (if you use bulk yeast
  • 6 cups All-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp Salt
  • 4 tbsp Sugar
Fats
  • 1/3 cup Olive oil
Water
  • 110F  Degree 2 cups warm water
  • 2 tsp Water
    1. In your mixing bowl, dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup warm water. Add 1 tablespoon sugar; let stand for 5 minutes until it becomes bubbly/foamy. Add the oil, salt, remaining warm water and sugar and 4 cups flour. Beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to form a soft dough.

    2. Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. Place back into bowl. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour.
    3. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide into 8 pieces or two large pieces for bread
    4. Shape each into a ball and than flatten just a bit to spread out a little. Place 2 in. apart on greased baking sheets.
    5. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes. Beat egg yolk and a splash of cold water; brush over rolls with a pastry brush.
    6. With a sharp knife (I like non stick knives), cut a 1/4-in.-deep cross on tops of rolls
    7. Bake at 400° for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from baking sheet to wire racks to cool.
    Recipe Notes

    After brushing bread with yolk (I prefer yolk for the golden hue it gives the bread), I sprinkle artisan cheese, roasted sesame seeds or cayenne pepper before baking.

    Store in a covered container for up to 1 week or in the refrigerator for 10 days.

    I originally found the basic roll recipe on Pinterest

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Seeds and Soil

I cannot believe we are coming up on our 6th year! We have grown with over 600 Alaskans (and some lower 48 friends).

If you know someone that would benefit from our classes but may not have the means, please email me directly: seedsandsoilorganics@gmail.com. We do cap the number of participants in our classes and workshops. I provide “support” throughout the growing seasons to come and we have to ensure a full commitment to each of our class participants.

Our online classes are hosted on a teaching platform (non-zoom). Classes are about 2 hours long with the exception of the seed classes in which a recorded video lesson is the precursor. Each and every class is recorded and all presentation materials including the video are sent out within 24 hours of the event.

As I start designing the 2022 classes, workshops and coursework…I am reflecting on the old, ancient, ancestral, intuitive and natural growing methods that have been past down for thousands of years. Our upcoming classes will be vested in the ways of the old coupled with the lessons of an ever shifting and living growing space.

Below please find a deeper summary of the upcoming classes and some exciting events that are sure to please.

Our first class starts in September 2021- Home to Harvest. Join us as we share our processes on long term cold storage, our in home root cellar, how we preserve our flowers, vegetables and herbs for winter use. Everyone wants to know how we are cooking our harvested carrots in January- join us and learn how.

We have added Advanced Seed Starting to our Seven class series! We provide the seeds- 24 seed types including perennial edibles, vegetables, flowers and herbs.

The Spring Seed Starting class includes 18 types of seeds (supplying all the needs of the sub arctic garden). We add new varieties every year. We share everything we know about “how to grow, where to grow and how to save the seed”.

We have added Prepare for Planting as a core course as these are the most asked questions/answers/mistakes we have ever encountered. So much success can be gained in growing in the far North with proper bed preparation and balanced soil.

Of course Permaculture design (must), soil and soil amendments will lead the charge following Advanced Seed Starting.

We have an entire new series for 2022! “The Permaculture Series” will be defined and outlined by the end of July. Thank you to everyone who has emailed showing their interest.

We have some amazing guests to further our knowledge on an array of topics including animal husbandry, Advanced Permaculture design, mushroom cultivation and so much more.

Our hearts are full of gratitude. Thank you all for such an amazing journey…through seed and soil.

Here is the link for registration: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/product-category/dec-2021-2022-classes/

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What seeds are we starting this week?

Tomatoes!

Everyone’s favorite fruit 🙂

Timing is of the essence here as we would like to transplant them outside after all fear have frost has passed and temperatures are above 45F. Tomatoes may suffer tissue damage otherwise.

We want to transplant without fruit and flowers as these are critical growing stages and can be very shocking. Starting seeds at the right time (nowish).

Tomato seeds like warm soil temperature and even moisture. Tomatoes are not a large seed and should be sown at 1/8″-1/4″.

We have around 2.5 months prior to our target date- start them in 4″ pots so they have room to grow and reduce the amount of “potting ups”.

Feed your tomatoes every couple of weeks and provide them adequate light and heat. Interplant with aromatic herbs such as basil, parsley and oregano. Depending on your type use cages or trellising…homegrown sweetness is just around the corner (well roughly 5 months).

Yes we do have tomato seeds available: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/product-category/shop-seeds/

Alaska sown-Alaska Grown

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What seeds are we starting this week?

Cabbage!

Cabbage seeds are small and should not be planted deeply. 1/4″ depth is perfect for them. Germination temperature is vast: 45F-85F…try to stay within this range. The more consistent temperature/moisture is present the more consistent and timely germination is possible.

Cabbages are heavy feeders- they are large plants with a long growing season. As we are providing all of their needs indoors, remember to feed them often.

Not all cabbages are alike…some are great for rolls, wraps, wilted veggies bowls and fresh shredding. Others are perfect for sauerkraut and long term storage.

Cabbages are large plants and take their time to grow. The target indoor start date is between 8-10 weeks of killing frosts (28F). One thing about my favorite cabbage is that it is exceptionally cold hardy and has overwintered in the field.

The cold hardiness allows it to be transplanted out earlier than other types. It can withstand really, really cold temperatures and with just a little protection can be set out as soon as the soil can be worked.

What does as soon as the soil can be worked mean? When the snow and ice have melted, your boot isn’t covered in soil mud AND you can no longer wring the water out of the soil. Using a soil thermometer is another tool that can help guide us to know if we are at/above 50F (the ideal soil temperature for cabbages).

Brunswick Drumhead cabbage is my favorite! This cabbage is perfect for kraut, storage, rolls, fresh, wraps and wilted.

We do have seeds available: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/product/brunswick-cabbage-brassica-oleracea/

Alaska sown-Alaska grown

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To soak or not to soak…that is the question (?)

The ecological relationship between seed and soil is like a symphony; there are natural cues that promote germination.

One of the major cues is moisture level! When the conditions are right, the seed will follow its own instinct and begin to swell. Once the seed coat is soft and moist the new seedling erupts into life.

The germination time for seeds varies greatly depending on the species. Some seeds can take years for germination (peonies) and others germinate in less than three days (cabbage family). We can use a mechanical force to speed the germination time (soaking).

Large seeds with hard coats (sunflowers, honeywort, peas, beans, corn and sweet peas) will appreciate a longer soaking- up to 24 hours.

Larger seeds with softer coats such as pumpkins, squash, chard, beets, nasturtium and cucumber are perfect to soak overnight.

Small seeds like lettuce, radish, carrots and tomatoes can become mushy and sticky if soaked too long (15-30 min) is appropriate.

Find a shallow bowl, place your seeds and top with water. Set away from pets, kids and spouses out of direct sunlight and in a warm location. Warm water is best but any water will do (what would nature do).

Once seeds have soaked and swelled…it is time to plant! Follow your seed packet guidelines for planting depth or reference our write up: https://seedsandsoilorganics.com/…/seed-starting-simply/

When in doubt…ask the question: What would nature do?

Alaska Sown-Alaska Grown